{"_id":"569932cf3da4370d009d20e6","project":"5633ebff7e9e880d00af1a53","version":{"_id":"5633ec007e9e880d00af1a56","project":"5633ebff7e9e880d00af1a53","__v":16,"createdAt":"2015-10-30T22:15:28.105Z","releaseDate":"2015-10-30T22:15:28.105Z","categories":["5633ec007e9e880d00af1a57","5633f072737ea01700ea329d","5637a37d0704070d00f06cf4","5637cf4e7ca5de0d00286aeb","564503082c74cf1900da48b4","564503cb7f1fff210078e70a","567af26cb56bac0d0019d87d","567afeb8802b2b17005ddea0","567aff47802b2b17005ddea1","567b0005802b2b17005ddea3","568adfffcbd4ca0d00aebf7e","56ba80078cf7c9210009673e","574d127f6f075519007da3d0","574fde60aef76a0e00840927","57a22ba6cd51b22d00f623a0","5a062c15a66ae1001a3f5b09"],"is_deprecated":false,"is_hidden":false,"is_beta":false,"is_stable":true,"codename":"","version_clean":"1.0.0","version":"1.0"},"__v":4,"parentDoc":null,"user":"5637d336aa96490d00a64f81","category":{"_id":"568adfffcbd4ca0d00aebf7e","project":"5633ebff7e9e880d00af1a53","version":"5633ec007e9e880d00af1a56","__v":1,"pages":["568ae00c7a42220d00498265"],"sync":{"url":"","isSync":false},"reference":false,"createdAt":"2016-01-04T21:11:27.469Z","from_sync":false,"order":5,"slug":"dashboards","title":"Common Tools"},"updates":["59d7cad6d5525800101ae5a5"],"next":{"pages":[],"description":""},"createdAt":"2016-01-15T17:56:31.479Z","link_external":false,"link_url":"","githubsync":"","sync_unique":"","hidden":false,"api":{"results":{"codes":[]},"settings":"","auth":"required","params":[],"url":""},"isReference":false,"order":2,"body":"Kibana is an open-source data visualization and dashboard tool built for time-series analytics with Elasticsearch. It takes advantage of Elasticsearch’s full-text querying and aggregation capabilities to built highly flexible and interactive dashboards.\n\nYour Bonsai cluster supports Kibana by default, via the standard Elasticsearch HTTP protocol. We use it frequently ourselves, and this article describes how you can set up and run Kibana with your Bonsai cluster.\n\n\n## Do you offer hosted Kibana dashboards with clusters?\nPrevious versions of Bonsai embedded a modified installation of Kibana 3 for user convenience, and for compatibility with the authentication required by default on Bonsai clusters.\n\nMore recent versions of Kibana now comes with an embedded web server, and are also compatible with your Bonsai clusters by default. This makes it more practical for you to self-host Kibana on your own local development server, or as a Heroku application.\n\n\n## How can I use Kibana with my Bonsai cluster?\nBecause Kibana is so trivial to use now, it makes more sense for users to run their own instance. We have a [simple button](https://github.com/omc/heroku-kibana) that you can click to deploy a free Kibana 4 dashboard on Heroku, which can  be configured with your Bonsai URL. \n\nIf you’re looking for a simple hosted solution, we recommend checking out our [Kibana one-click deployment button for Heroku](https://github.com/omc/heroku-kibana). We use this to quickly start and stop our own internal Kibana dashboards. (Note: this project is still in beta, and your feedback is welcome.)\n\nYou may also download Kibana 4 and run it locally if you're on a shared tier with Elasticsearch versions 1.5, 1.7, or 2.2. We support Elasticsearch 2.3 for dedicated plans, so you may also use Kibana 4.5.\n\nTo configure Kibana to connect to your Bonsai cluster, you need to set the value for `elasticsearch_url` in the `kibana.yml` configuration file. For example:\n\n    elasticsearch_url: \"https://apikey:apisecret:::at:::yourcluster-12345.us-east-1.bonsai.io\"\n\nTo configure Kibana 5.x you must also specify the Bonsai cluster's username/password as configuration options:\n\n    elasticsearch_url: \"https://apikey:apisecret@yourcluster-12345.us-east-1.bonsai.io:443\"\n    elasticsearch.username: \"apikey\"\n    elasticsearch.password: \"apisecret\"\n\nEither method will work fine and allow you to visualize the data in your cluster. If you run into any problems, you might consult the [Kibana documentation](https://www.elastic.co/guide/en/kibana/current/index.html), or feel free to give us [a shout](mailto:support@bonsai.io).","excerpt":"","slug":"using-kibana-with-bonsai","type":"basic","title":"Using Kibana with Bonsai"}

Using Kibana with Bonsai


Kibana is an open-source data visualization and dashboard tool built for time-series analytics with Elasticsearch. It takes advantage of Elasticsearch’s full-text querying and aggregation capabilities to built highly flexible and interactive dashboards. Your Bonsai cluster supports Kibana by default, via the standard Elasticsearch HTTP protocol. We use it frequently ourselves, and this article describes how you can set up and run Kibana with your Bonsai cluster. ## Do you offer hosted Kibana dashboards with clusters? Previous versions of Bonsai embedded a modified installation of Kibana 3 for user convenience, and for compatibility with the authentication required by default on Bonsai clusters. More recent versions of Kibana now comes with an embedded web server, and are also compatible with your Bonsai clusters by default. This makes it more practical for you to self-host Kibana on your own local development server, or as a Heroku application. ## How can I use Kibana with my Bonsai cluster? Because Kibana is so trivial to use now, it makes more sense for users to run their own instance. We have a [simple button](https://github.com/omc/heroku-kibana) that you can click to deploy a free Kibana 4 dashboard on Heroku, which can be configured with your Bonsai URL. If you’re looking for a simple hosted solution, we recommend checking out our [Kibana one-click deployment button for Heroku](https://github.com/omc/heroku-kibana). We use this to quickly start and stop our own internal Kibana dashboards. (Note: this project is still in beta, and your feedback is welcome.) You may also download Kibana 4 and run it locally if you're on a shared tier with Elasticsearch versions 1.5, 1.7, or 2.2. We support Elasticsearch 2.3 for dedicated plans, so you may also use Kibana 4.5. To configure Kibana to connect to your Bonsai cluster, you need to set the value for `elasticsearch_url` in the `kibana.yml` configuration file. For example: elasticsearch_url: "https://apikey:apisecret@yourcluster-12345.us-east-1.bonsai.io" To configure Kibana 5.x you must also specify the Bonsai cluster's username/password as configuration options: elasticsearch_url: "https://apikey:apisecret@yourcluster-12345.us-east-1.bonsai.io:443" elasticsearch.username: "apikey" elasticsearch.password: "apisecret" Either method will work fine and allow you to visualize the data in your cluster. If you run into any problems, you might consult the [Kibana documentation](https://www.elastic.co/guide/en/kibana/current/index.html), or feel free to give us [a shout](mailto:support@bonsai.io).